Come Experience The Unique Comedy of Jason Neistadt at Las Vegas’ Best Variety Show

Being a Comic Vocal Impressionist takes a lot of practice, Just ask Jason Neistadt of V-The Ultimate Variety Show! Having been featured in every major resort and casino in Las Vegas, Jason has his act perfected down to the T! Elvis, Forest Gump and everyone in between, you never know who might turn up in this unique act. Born in Rancho Cucamonga, CA in 1976, Jason began showing early inclinations of a performer. When Jason was two he moved to Wyoming, and over the years developed his interest in stunts and acrobatics while playing in the surrounding mountains. When moving back to California at age ten Jason quickly became known as the class clown and soon after that, he learned his first performing art, juggling! From there on he committed himself to the art of the juggle and sought to bring joy to whoever he could, using his impersonations and juggling acts.

Becoming fixed on perfecting his juggling skills, Jason soon saw what he would declare his destiny. On a family vacation to Las Vegas, he was taken to see “Melinda-The First Lady of Magic!” There he saw Anthony Gatto the master and best technical juggler in the world as part of Melinda’s variety act. As he puts it, he spent all of his allowance at the magic store the very next day, intrigued by the mix of magic and juggling he had never before thought possible. Soon after, Jason was perfecting and showing his act at birthday parties and charity events. By the age of 13 his juggling skills had increased, and he was soon accepted into the world famous “Magic Castle” in Hollywood. Focusing on performing arts in High-school, Jason made all the necessary steps to graduate early, and by age 16 saw himself moving directly to Hollywood.

He ended up graduating the juniors program of the Magic Castle, and even received a Juniors Achievement Award at a banquet held for graduates. In 1993 Jason performed at the opening night for the MGM Grand Casino, quickly realizing this is where he wanted to stay. Jason was always an artist first, and with that in mind Las Vegas became his muse and playground to learn and experiment. Eventually landing dream roles as a stuntman in two major motion pictures, he continued to strive to learn new forms of performance to carry on his career. In 2003 Jason began working with David Saxe, the brother of one of his original inspirations, Melinda. Jason soon became Executive Vice President of David Saxe productions for nearly seven years, until he decided performing was his true passion. Now with his own one man show in the works, Jason has been a featured host on V-The Ultimate Variety Show many times. Often considered the best variety show in Las Vegas, V-The Ultimate Variety Show isn’t his only gig, while he travels the world performing his act on all major cruise lines, Jasons back in town showing audiences all his different faces every week.

So come and see the all too familiar personalities of comedic impressionist Jason Neistadt, only at “V-The Ultimate Variety Show,” at the V Theater located inside the Miracle Mile Shops of Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino!

The Unique Forms and Functions of Indigenous Ghanaian Performing and Verbal Arts

Performing arts are the arts that are played or performed which exists only in a stream of time. This form of arts is evident in every activity that the indigenous Ghanaian performs, from the washing of the face right from bed, through undertakings of his/her daily activities, to the time he/she retires to bed. Examples of the performing art forms practiced and used by the indigenous Ghanaians in their everyday life activities include music, dance, and drama.

On the other hand, verbal arts are those that are performed with the mouth with or without body gestures. They are usually spoken with the mouth. Indigenous Ghanaian verbal arts include folklores, tales, appellations, dirges, poetry etc.

Music

Music permeates and accompanies all the activities undertaken by the indigenous Ghanaians such as hunting, fishing, farming, trading etc. Music is played during festivals, rituals, marriage ceremonies, funeral ceremonies, puberty rites, naming and outdooring ceremonies, funeral rites etc. They played various roles such as entertainment, worship of deities, veneration and inviting of the ancestors, etc. Various musical instruments were used for the composing and playing of the music. They included stringed instruments (hites, lyres), wind instruments (flutes, horns), self-sounding instruments (drums, rattle) etc. Music was specially performed in the royal palaces, town squares, courtyards, parks, and streets. The lyrics of the music embody the religious and cultural beliefs of the indigenous Ghanaians, as well as their ideologies, norms, and values. They were purely educative and were used as a channel for moral instruction.

Dance

Dance, like music, plays a vibrant role in the lives of the indigenous Ghanaians. They ranged from graceful movements to very vigorous movements depending on the style of dance and the occasion and context within which the dance is performed. A dance was performing at naming ceremonies, funeral rites, festivals, religious activities, storytelling sessions etc. Some of the dance movements were symbolic and carried important messages. For instance, the dance performed at durbars, festivals, ritualistic performances and ceremonies of the ancestors by a traditional priest and his attendance were interpreted as messages from the ancestors to the people especially the king. Others were purely for entertainment to relieve stress and enjoy oneself.

Drama

Indigenous Ghanaian drama was evident at virtually all places such as the market and public squares, farms, chop bars, meeting places etc. It was performed at storytelling, initiation rites, and ceremonies of the ancestors to instruct the people concerning the laws, norms, taboos and beliefs of the people. They usually illustrated themes regarding the repercussions of not heeding to the laws and traditions handed down by the ancestors. Moral lessons on how to live a good life were enshrined in the drama performances.

Folklores

They are the unwritten or oral stories that portray the culture of a group or community. Indigenous Ghanaian folklores narrate the activities and events of our forefathers and the origin of our societal laws, values, and norms. They are mediums through which the young ones in the society familiarize themselves with their own cultural heritage. These stories are viewed as true and are taken with all seriousness.

Tales

They are stories narrated to entertain and educate people. They are usually fictitious with unreal characters. They are sometimes full of exaggerations and lies though they are used in highlighting the woes in breaking the laid down rules, customs and taboos of the ancestors in the indigenous Ghanaian communities.

Appellations

These are praises shouted on a god, ancestor, king or important personality recounting his achievements, character, and ego. They are shouted on kings and important personalities during important occasions such as durbars, festivals, and ceremonies before they take their seat at a function. During ceremonies where the ancestors ought to be invited, their appellations are sounded. It was believed by the indigenous Ghanaians that doing this would attract favor, goodwill, blessing and help from the ancestors.

Proverbs

They are short wise sayings that illustrate the bravery of the ancestors. They explain the laws, norms, and ideas of the indigenous Ghanaians. They were narrated at festivals, ceremonies and at storytelling times as a form of moral, cultural and social education for the people.

Dirges

They are words composed for the deceased. They are narrated to console and comfort the bereaved family and sympathizers during funeral ceremonies of their loved ones in the indigenous Ghanaian communities. They educate us on the brevity of our life and the wickedness attributed to death, and the hope that we have to live again. In most occasions, musical instruments accompany these dirges.